• The KillerFrogs

New Statue

Wog68

Active Member
I was the Wog student manager the year James came to Texas Christian. James wasn't a good shooter and Rollie Cornish, the Wog coach, asked me to help him develop a jump shot. Although that didn't become his strong suit, he was tough around the basket, a very strong rebounder, a great teammate, and a better person. You had to be there to understand what he had to put up with when we traveled. But, what was most impressive was his intellectual capacity. I believe his freshman year he took courses like advanced physics and Russian. You knew that he was special.
 
“He was one of the five best players in TCU history and should have won the Heisman,” national sportswriter and TCU historian Dan Jenkins ’53 told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram in 2005.
….
Swink’s elusive running style, especially in the open field, made him one of the most acclaimed halfbacks in Southwest Conference history and helped the Horned Frogs to a SWC crown in 1955 and back-to-back Cotton Bowl appearances in 1956 and 1957 under coach Abe Martin.
….
Swink was a popular speaker at campus pep rallies in the 1950s. He served in student government and was a standout student, while playing football and basketball for the Horned Frogs. His wife Jeannie told the Tyler Morning Telegraph that he was most proud of being an Academic All-American.
….
Swink was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1966 and served as a medic and surgeon at the 12th Evacuation Hospital in Ku Chi, South Vietnam, during the Vietnam War. He earned the rank of captain and was awarded a Purple Heart, Air Medal and Bronze Star.

He returned to Fort Worth and established an orthopedic surgery practice, which he maintained for 35 years.

Swink also is remembered for being the object of the famous University of Texas expression, “Hook ’em, Horns.” Before No. 8 TCU squared off with the Longhorns on Nov. 12, 1955, Texas students had heard of Swink’s evasive style and developed the oft-heard phrase.

“They had a guy in their student body that knew our team and spread the word that they needed to stop me from running,” Swink told the magazine in 2006. “The Texas players obviously had heard about how string a team we had, too. So they came up with ‘hook him’ because they wanted to catch me, trip me up, slow me down. And that game was the first time they used that.”

It didn’t work. Swink had one of his best games, rushing for 235 yards on 15 carries for a 15.7-yard average and scored a school-record 26 points. The Frogs romped the Longhorns, 47-20.
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lowfrog

Active Member
Just got an email about a new statue of former basketball player and still involved alumni "Dr. James Cash" going up. On a side note I think LT should have a statue too.
Would rather have a parking garage at TCU named after me. With big, bold lettering on the signs at the entrances/exits lit up all night with bright spotlights. Anyone who parks in the garage sees the sign going in and remembers the name and where they parked their vehicle. Might get lost on campus, but just ask someone for directions or pull up a TCU campus map on your phone. Everyone knows where your parking garage is located.
 

Tim Griffin

Active Member
Maybe. But I am often dumbfounded by those who do not realize what he did for us and where this program was in 2000. The man is why we still have a fighting chance at the big table, at least for now. It was time, but what he did for TCU should never be dismissed or forgotten.
absolutely.
 

Tim Griffin

Active Member
“He was one of the five best players in TCU history and should have won the Heisman,” national sportswriter and TCU historian Dan Jenkins ’53 told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram in 2005.
….
Swink’s elusive running style, especially in the open field, made him one of the most acclaimed halfbacks in Southwest Conference history and helped the Horned Frogs to a SWC crown in 1955 and back-to-back Cotton Bowl appearances in 1956 and 1957 under coach Abe Martin.
….
Swink was a popular speaker at campus pep rallies in the 1950s. He served in student government and was a standout student, while playing football and basketball for the Horned Frogs. His wife Jeannie told the Tyler Morning Telegraph that he was most proud of being an Academic All-American.
….
Swink was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1966 and served as a medic and surgeon at the 12th Evacuation Hospital in Ku Chi, South Vietnam, during the Vietnam War. He earned the rank of captain and was awarded a Purple Heart, Air Medal and Bronze Star.

He returned to Fort Worth and established an orthopedic surgery practice, which he maintained for 35 years.

Swink also is remembered for being the object of the famous University of Texas expression, “Hook ’em, Horns.” Before No. 8 TCU squared off with the Longhorns on Nov. 12, 1955, Texas students had heard of Swink’s evasive style and developed the oft-heard phrase.

“They had a guy in their student body that knew our team and spread the word that they needed to stop me from running,” Swink told the magazine in 2006. “The Texas players obviously had heard about how string a team we had, too. So they came up with ‘hook him’ because they wanted to catch me, trip me up, slow me down. And that game was the first time they used that.”

It didn’t work. Swink had one of his best games, rushing for 235 yards on 15 carries for a 15.7-yard average and scored a school-record 26 points. The Frogs romped the Longhorns, 47-20.
View attachment 11746
saw that game as a jr. high student from Corpus.
 
Would rather have a parking garage at TCU named after me. With big, bold lettering on the signs at the entrances/exits lit up all night with bright spotlights. Anyone who parks in the garage sees the sign going in and remembers the name and where they parked their vehicle. Might get lost on campus, but just ask someone for directions or pull up a TCU campus map on your phone. Everyone knows where your parking garage is located.
I’d be happy with a bathroom in the basement.
 

Hoosierfrog

Tier 1
Not sure a big GP falling out of the sky and wiggling in my face would be a good time, but to each their own.
Jake Gyllenhaal Love GIF
 

Frogs1983

Member
I was as ready for Gary to go as anyone, but the last few years does not at all detract from what he did for TCU and the heights he led the program to. TCU chose to part ways, and he is free to do as he chooses with the rest of his career.
Burlap bag needs to go over that statue as long as he is running around wearing ugly burnt orange attire and showing it on social media.
 
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