• The KillerFrogs

TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine now just TCU!

Excellent. Needless to say, this is a big deal.

Honestly always hoped TCU would acquire other components of UNTHSC, too, and though that ship probably just sailed this is the biggest asset. With an an elite nursing program and now a fully-stood-up MD program, we have some cache to launch other programs down the line if we want.

I would expect some facilities announcements in the near future. Land has been acquired.
It’s coming.
 

Hemingway

Active Member
That property we own down on Rosedale in the medical neighborhood now needs a building. If I just had $50,000,000 available, we could have a very nice building and we could then speak of the TCU Brog Medical school. Any other takers here on FF?
Huh? You want your med little med students in the middle of the night walking to their cars on Rosedale? That’s a helluva selling point.

Just bulldoze some more houses they own on Berry st.
 

Brog

Full Member
Huh? You want your med little med students in the middle of the night walking to their cars on Rosedale? That’s a helluva selling point.

Just bulldoze some more houses they own on Berry st.
Hey Hemingway, catch up. The building on Rosedale would be the Medical school building, not the dormitories for the students. A Medical School building works best if it's right in the middle of an active hospital/medical district.
 

Hemingway

Active Member
Hey Hemingway, catch up. The building on Rosedale would be the Medical school building, not the dormitories for the students. A Medical School building works best if it's right in the middle of an active hospital/medical district.
If you’ve been through the med school thing you know they’ve got some long long hours.
 

TCUdirtbag

Active Member
If you’ve been through the med school thing you know they’ve got some long long hours.

You also know that a ton of med schools and hospitals are located in not-the-best-areas-of-town.

Navigating safety is basically part of the medical school/residency curriculum.
 
Texas A&M University School of Law, from Wikipedia:

“Texas A&M University is ranked 53rd nationally in the 2022 edition of the U.S. News Rankings of Best Law Schools. The school is also ranked 7th for its intellectual property law program and 8th for its dispute resolution program for 2022.

Texas A&M's overall U.S. News ranking has increased rapidly since 2015, when it was unranked. Between 1998 and 2020, the school experienced the largest increase of any law school to its academic reputation score. This score, based on a survey of law school faculties, is the largest single factor in the U.S. News rankings methodology. U.S. News has previously ranked the law school 149th (2016), 111th (2017), 92nd (2018), 80th (2019), 83rd (2020), and 60th (2021).”

SMU and Baylor are ranked 52nd and 58th nationally in the 2022 U.S. News Rankings of Best Law Schools. In Texas, only UT at Austin is ranked significantly higher, at 16th, than Texas A&M’s Fort Worth law school ranking of 53rd.
 
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froginaustin

Active Member
Not sure where this comes from, but the deal died because TCU never offered what Wesleyan thought was fmv.

. . . and TCU thought was a lot more than FMV.

A'nM seems to me to have paid a premium for a law school already on the ground, and avoided the political fights and delays that trying to set up a scratch law school involve.

My best guess is that all 3, Wesleyan, TCU, and A'nM, did the best they could for their respective interests. I'm not so sure that the taxpayers got a good deal, with law schools being basically overbuilt even before A'nM (and UNT Law) came onto the scene.
 
From Wikipedia: “The agreement became final on August 12, 2013, with Texas A&M purchasing the school and all its physical and licensing assets for $73 million.”

In the context of $113 million spent on the football stadium‘s East Side Club, $73 million appears like a good deal for the purchaser—for an already up and running accredited law school. Texas A&M then quickly turned it into one of this country’s best and I wonder how they accomplished that. The location and its surroundings appear dang good too—easy to get to on an edge of downtown, adjacent to the Water Gardens, and close to central business district law firms.

Also, it is the only law school in the 13th largest, and growing, city in the country (Fort Worth), thus it is the only option of convenience for anyone living in Fort Worth and wanting that J.D. degree. Houston has three, Dallas two, and San Antonio, Austin, Waco and Lubbock each have one.

Texas A&M saw opportunity in Fort Worth. TCU will likely never reconsider a law school in its hometown because Texas A&M closed that window.

A&M is now collaborating with Fort Worth government and industry to spend $250 million and build “Aggieland North,” a research campus with two new buildings that will connect with the law school building after it is renovated or rebuilt, the law school to serve as “the front door and academic anchor of the urban campus.”
 
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McFroggin

Active Member
Texas A&M University School of Law, from Wikipedia:

“Texas A&M University is ranked 53rd nationally in the 2022 edition of the U.S. News Rankings of Best Law Schools. The school is also ranked 7th for its intellectual property law program and 8th for its dispute resolution program for 2022.

Texas A&M's overall U.S. News ranking has increased rapidly since 2015, when it was unranked. Between 1998 and 2020, the school experienced the largest increase of any law school to its academic reputation score. This score, based on a survey of law school faculties, is the largest single factor in the U.S. News rankings methodology. U.S. News has previously ranked the law school 149th (2016), 111th (2017), 92nd (2018), 80th (2019), 83rd (2020), and 60th (2021).”

SMU and Baylor are ranked 52nd and 58th nationally in the 2022 U.S. News Rankings of Best Law Schools.

They really did a fantastic job with the school. Faculty additions have been great.
 
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hiphopfroggy

Active Member
From Wikipedia: “The agreement became final on August 12, 2013, with Texas A&M purchasing the school and all its physical and licensing assets for $73 million.”

In the context of $113 million spent on the football stadium‘s East Side Club, $73 million appears like a good deal for the purchaser—for an already up and running accredited law school. Texas A&M then quickly turned it into one of this country’s best and I wonder how they accomplished that. The location and its surroundings appear dang good too—easy to get to on an edge of downtown, adjacent to the Water Gardens, and close to central business district law firms.

Also, it is the only law school in the 13th largest, and growing, city in the country (Fort Worth), thus it is the only option of convenience for anyone living in Fort Worth and wanting that J.D. degree. Houston has three, Dallas two, and San Antonio, Austin, Waco and Lubbock each have one.

Texas A&M pounced and excelled on an opportunity in Fort Worth. TCU will likely never reconsider a law school in its hometown because Texas A&M closed that window.
Ferrari dropped the ball here, absolutely tragic that TCU did not close this deal. [ What the heck? ]?!?!
 

Dogfrog

Active Member
The area around the hospital district is not scary to me. Tons of offices, apartments, and restaurants in the area.
I know a young person that lives in a very nice loft in an old building in that area. Basically surrounded by Magnolia, Eighth, and downtown. Also some nice commercial development happening on Vickery.
 

YA

Full Member
The whole southside has been transformed in the last 5 years. The number of offices, apartments/condos and restaurants/bars coming into the area is impressive. In another 5 years that place will be even more impressive and destination living/playing than almost any area of Fort Worth. It is unreal the amount of $ being poured into the area.
 

Frog-in-law1995

Active Member
The whole southside has been transformed in the last 5 years. The number of offices, apartments/condos and restaurants/bars coming into the area is impressive. In another 5 years that place will be even more impressive and destination living/playing than almost any area of Fort Worth. It is unreal the amount of $ being poured into the area.
Of all the changes over there, my favorite is that Benito’s started serving chips and salsa.
 

TCUdirtbag

Active Member
Not sure where this comes from, but the deal died because TCU never offered what Wesleyan thought was fmv.

I have always been told the reason Wesleyan could turn the low-ball deal down was that the Basses ponied up cash to keep them afloat. I’ve never prodded at the voracity of the claim, but by 2008 Wesleyan was again in pretty dire straits and was grossly expanding their classes to bring in tuition revenue so they could pay the bills.

TCU would’ve had to compete with SMU and Baylor out the gate. Much of A&M’s success is due to there being no public law school in north Texas (UT is highly competitive, and UNT Dallas’ startup struggled to even get accredited). With low tuition and deep pockets to operate at a deficit for a decade, A&M could afford to shrink the classes, buy out tenured profs and hire better ones, throw insane scholarship money at student recruiting and, frankly, decimate Texas Tech’s applicant pipeline with the promise of less debt (again through scholarship subsidies operating at a net loss) and not living in Lubbock. They also cannibalized a good chunk of the north Texas to U of H pipeline and started pulling students from higher-ranked but extremely expensive SMU. TCU never could’ve replicated that model because it rests so much on the public school price, deep state pockets, and Aggie brand.

I am extremely glad TCU swung and missed. Some people in this thread appear to think TCU could’ve done with Wesleyan what A&M has done. That is not the case. Trade an extremely challenging and expensive law school turnaround for a new MD med school 10 out of 10 times.
 
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