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DMN: ‘He bled crimson’: Alabama community embraces TCU’s Kent Waldrep one last time

TopFrog

ALL HAIL THE HYPNOTOAD

‘He bled crimson’: Alabama community embraces TCU’s Kent Waldrep one last time​

Kevin Sherrington, The Dallas Morning News

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TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — In the last official act of kindness toward Kent Waldrep, a former TCU running back that the University of Alabama wrapped its arms around after he fell in the fall of 1974 and never got up again, the Crimson Tide went all out last Friday, as usual. Even made Waldrep, who died in February at 67 after nearly a half-century championing the disabled, an honorary Alabama alumnus.

Waldrep, his wife, Lynn, and sons, Trey and Charley, had been the beneficiaries of Alabama’s goodwill ever since Bear Bryant made a 20-year-old kid from Alvin his personal project. Bryant’s worried face was the first thing Waldrep saw when he woke up in the hospital, and they remained close until the Bear’s death in 1983.

His former players and coaches picked up the mantle, for which the Waldreps were ever grateful.

Read more at https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nc...80-99s-kent-waldrep-one-last-time/ar-AA12oYA3
 

Virginia Frog

ALL HAIL THE HYPNOTOAD
according to physiologists/ linebacker kenny cain the anewer to your question is an emphatic no
The term "Crimson Tide" does comes from blood.

The blood of the crewmen of the CSS Alabama (Confederate, heavens change their name immediately!) and their battle off the coast of France in 1864. The "Crimson Tide" was the color of the water after their heroic battle.

Edouard Manet's "The Battle of the USS Kearsarge and the CSS Alabama" hangs in the Philadelphia Museum of Art (The "Rocky" steps).

 

Zubaz

ALL HAIL THE HYPNOTOAD
The term "Crimson Tide" does comes from blood.

The blood of the crewmen of the CSS Alabama (Confederate, heavens change their name immediately!) and their battle off the coast of France in 1864. The "Crimson Tide" was the color of the water after their heroic battle.

Edouard Manet's "The Battle of the USS Kearsarge and the CSS Alabama" hangs in the Philadelphia Museum of Art (The "Rocky" steps).

Good info. I honestly didn't know a Civil War battle took place....in the English channel.

Also, as someone who thinks confederate memorials should be removed....I'm kinda fine celebrating them having to spill blood. Patton's "make some other [ "illegitimate Baylor boy" ] [bleed] for his" and all.
 

PurpleBlood87

ALL HAIL THE HYPNOTOAD
The term "Crimson Tide" does comes from blood.

The blood of the crewmen of the CSS Alabama (Confederate, heavens change their name immediately!) and their battle off the coast of France in 1864. The "Crimson Tide" was the color of the water after their heroic battle.

Edouard Manet's "The Battle of the USS Kearsarge and the CSS Alabama" hangs in the Philadelphia Museum of Art (The "Rocky" steps).

Crimson Tide comes from a sports writer according the University of Alabama.

Crimson Tide Story​

At the 1907 Iron Bowl in Birmingham, Alabama held the heavily-favored Auburn (at the time) at a 6-6 tie. The game was played in a sea of crimson mud and the Alabama players’ white uniforms were stained crimson. As a sports editor for the Birmingham Age-Herald, Hugh Roberts, left the field, he described Alabama as a Crimson Tide. Sports writers then popularized the name and it’s stuck ever since.

By the end of your first year on campus, you may hear “Roll Tide” hundreds of times and might even be saying it to every person you see in Alabama gear! Roll Tide is not only a chant, it is a greeting, dismissal from classes, and an expression of the unity of our campus. So get prepared to join the Crimson Tide family and practice your “Roll Tide!” This phrase is one that unites Alabama fans everywhere.
 
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