• The KillerFrogs

Thoughts and Prayers requested

PurpleBlood87

Active Member
Mom is on the mend. The prayers and thoughts worked.
Not only did she have a UTI but also a hernia. She had a GI Tube since Monday to clean out stuff that had backed up into her stomach.

Today they did a dye test and saw her bowels are not obstructed. They took out the tube and she had her first food since the tube went down.

She's on a clear liquid diet but was happy to eat anything. Still has a ways to go to build up her strength and get to rehab for her legs. Don't think rehab will take that long, I think the UTI zapped all the strength from her legs.
 

SwissArmyFrog

Active Member
Learned that with my grandparents. It is incredible what uti's can do regarding the mental situation. Similar to dementia symptoms. Get the uti cleared up and they become themselves again. Never knew this was a thing until our family dealt with it. If you notice them start not being themselves, now the first thing you need to do is have them tested for a uti.

There should be a required high school class...or a required 1 or 2 day seminar...for all students:

"Why the CRAP didn't someone tell me about this BEFORE?!?!"

Something else: this went on for like 2 or 3 months, with me examining alternatives at a compounding pharmacy - which pissed the HELL out of the rehab center doctor - before they thought, "Hmmm, maybe we should try something else."

That doctor losing his composure and control when he learned I was looking at alternatives (while his efforts had amounted to zero) really opened my eyes. There are a lot of great doctors, but every profession has its' [ Finebaum ]s. We need to be the ADVOCATES for our loved ones who are ill, especially ones who aren't able to speak for themselves clearly. I have a feeling that when professionals see us fight for our loved one, that is motivating for them (and I mean that in a good way).

One of the nicest, most inspiring things anyone ever said to me was during this time. I'd visited my mom most every day, and I came down the elevator to go to the parking lot one day. One of the ladies who worked there stopped me and said, "Thank you for not abandoning your mother..." She gave me some context, and her words helped me a great deal. I'll never forget them.

Sorry for the novel, haha
 

Palliative Care

Active Member
Sorry to report that too often communication falls short in my profession. I make no excuses for it. And it has happened to me as a patient and to my family members. We should do better.
Of note: dementia like symptoms with infections is a sign in we elderly that our cognitive health is not what it once was. Monitor such individuals for signs or progressive decline.
Also rehab is not for every body. However, failure to improve can be an indication of possible future decline as well.
 
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froginmn

Full Member
There should be a required high school class...or a required 1 or 2 day seminar...for all students:

"Why the CRAP didn't someone tell me about this BEFORE?!?!"

Something else: this went on for like 2 or 3 months, with me examining alternatives at a compounding pharmacy - which pissed the HELL out of the rehab center doctor - before they thought, "Hmmm, maybe we should try something else."

That doctor losing his composure and control when he learned I was looking at alternatives (while his efforts had amounted to zero) really opened my eyes. There are a lot of great doctors, but every profession has its' [ Finebaum ]s. We need to be the ADVOCATES for our loved ones who are ill, especially ones who aren't able to speak for themselves clearly. I have a feeling that when professionals see us fight for our loved one, that is motivating for them (and I mean that in a good way).

One of the nicest, most inspiring things anyone ever said to me was during this time. I'd visited my mom most every day, and I came down the elevator to go to the parking lot one day. One of the ladies who worked there stopped me and said, "Thank you for not abandoning your mother..." She gave me some context, and her words helped me a great deal. I'll never forget them.

Sorry for the novel, haha
My dad, who was a practicing physician himself, used to say that for every doctor who finished at the top of his class there was another who finished at the bottom...
 

froginmn

Full Member
Well, sometimes one really does need a proctologist...
LOL it wasn't uncommon for doctors to choose the specialties that were most in demand, so anyone could end up with any specialty.

Then you add in things like personality and bedside manner, surgical dexterity and more and docs could filter into any number of specialties. Many do research, work in non-patient facing disciplines, etc.
 

PurpleBlood87

Active Member
She had a little setback on Friday after an episode if throwing up after breakfast. She might of gotten too much liquid for breakfast and it didn't agree with her stomach.

The throwing up eased up Friday afternoon and about 1 pm today they put her back on a clear liquid diet. The doctor said if that went well she might get soft food tonight and see how she tolerates that.

We will see how that goes.
 

The TCU Football Jerk

Active Member
My dad, who was a practicing physician himself, used to say that for every doctor who finished at the top of his class there was another who finished at the bottom...

I'll send this thread off down another path, but I knew an air traffic controller who said basically the same thing. He said the cream of the crop goes to places like DFW, JFK, ORD, etc. Said you're in a bigger danger in the mid to small size market airports. Those are the bottom of the class folks.
 
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