• The KillerFrogs

The Greatness of Linda Kaye

PO Frog

Active Member
She was just great. My folks got tons of pics from her covering our baseball games in the mid 90s.

Edit: thinking back, it was the age before cell phone cameras were in every hand, so her live-action pics were a bigger deal back then than today’s youth can probably imagine. Really was amazing just to go through the archive and see so many images. Now people have that at their fingertips at all times.
 

froginaustin

Active Member
She was just great. My folks got tons of pics from her covering our baseball games in the mid 90s.

Edit: thinking back, it was the age before cell phone cameras were in every hand, so her live-action pics were a bigger deal back then than today’s youth can probably imagine. Really was amazing just to go through the archive and see so many images. Now people have that at their fingertips at all times.

Linda's pics were way better than what 99% of us could take with high-dollar camera equipment, and better than 99.999% of the pics most of us could take with the very newest, best cell phone.
 

BrewingFrog

Was I supposed to type something here?
Linda's pics were way better than what 99% of us could take with high-dollar camera equipment, and better than 99.999% of the pics most of us could take with the very newest, best cell phone.
This. Among her many gifts were those of not only composition, but context: Each of those pictures tells it's own story. And she was able, instinctively, to get herself in position to capture those moments with the contextual background that brought each image into iconic status. Plus, she managed to get it on old-fashioned film, with only 24 frames a roll. Nowadays, you can shoot tens of thousands of images at staggering definition, but then it was a part of the calculation that you had to be prudent with the images you had, and not waste.

As a Band member, we would crowd the endzones before halftime so that we could move into position and do our show once the teams headed to the locker rooms. Linda was always there, eyes out for things. In '84, she took a shot from very close to us of Kenneth Davis running into the end zone, two Tech defenders hard on his heels, with water splashing around their feet as they ran. The pic wound up on the front page of the Sports section the next day. As a larval photographer, I was amazed even then that I was looking at the same damned thing she was, but she saw so much more, and was able to capture it.
 

FrogAbroad

Full Member
This. Among her many gifts were those of not only composition, but context: Each of those pictures tells it's own story. And she was able, instinctively, to get herself in position to capture those moments with the contextual background that brought each image into iconic status. Plus, she managed to get it on old-fashioned film, with only 24 frames a roll. Nowadays, you can shoot tens of thousands of images at staggering definition, but then it was a part of the calculation that you had to be prudent with the images you had, and not waste.

As a Band member, we would crowd the endzones before halftime so that we could move into position and do our show once the teams headed to the locker rooms. Linda was always there, eyes out for things. In '84, she took a shot from very close to us of Kenneth Davis running into the end zone, two Tech defenders hard on his heels, with water splashing around their feet as they ran. The pic wound up on the front page of the Sports section the next day. As a larval photographer, I was amazed even then that I was looking at the same damned thing she was, but she saw so much more, and was able to capture it.
Linda had the amazing gift of being a storyteller who used no words.
 

Diehard

Moderator
Among the funniest things Wes and I ever saw was at a UT game. Probably late 80's early 90's or so in Austin. We were sitting on the 3rd or 4th row up behind a main aisle that ran in front of us. Some obnoxious (of course) Tea Sip was sitting to the right on the second row and Linda Kay walked by in front of him stopping to take a picture. He yelled to MOVE IT or GET MOVED. Man, she turned around and lit into that guy explaining that she was trying to make a living and said she only needed about 20 seconds of his precious "Orange Blood Time". And that she would move on her own when she was finished unless he had a better idea, or something to that effect. All he said back was "Yes Ma'am" and set back down. You had to be there, but Wes and I were almost in tears from laughing. Up until Wes passed on we would talk that 20 or 30 seconds where she so artfully put that guy in his place. Great memories! Go Frogs and Go Panthers.
 

FrogAbroad

Full Member
This is a great thread. It began with one, 58-years old photo and grew into a sharing of "mem'ries sweet" honoring a beloved "comrade true."

PB87, thank you again for posting that old photo. The rest of you, thank you for adding your memories and stories about Linda. She was...no...she is a TCU treasure and well worth being remembered and honored.

I'm sure this thread will not remain forever at the top of the most-frequently-read-and-commented-on forum threads, but please...those of you who can...please continue to add to this little collection of "Linda Lore."
 
This is a great thread. It began with one, 58-years old photo and grew into a sharing of "mem'ries sweet" honoring a beloved "comrade true."

PB87, thank you again for posting that old photo. The rest of you, thank you for adding your memories and stories about Linda. She was...no...she is a TCU treasure and well worth being remembered and honored.

I'm sure this thread will not remain forever at the top of the most-frequently-read-and-commented-on forum threads, but please...those of you who can...please continue to add to this little collection of "Linda Lore."
Linda and I ate regularly at Dos Gringos. Her home was a museum: TCU, Rangers, Click and Clack, Hopalong Cassidy and menorahs. Although Jewish, she had the highest grade ever recorded in the Life and Teachings of Jesus.
I loved her personal stories of athletes. She bought Nolan Ryan’s Lincoln so she would have more room for her equipment.
She loved TCU!
 

Toad Jones

Active Member
This picture has two important notes to be added. First the paint on D-M was barely dry when this picture was taken.
Secondly if memory is correct, this picture was taken in or around March 7th. On March 7th, Worth Hills received 2.50 inches of snow and TCU cancelled classes that day b/c of the snow. Also on that date, the cafeteria ran out of servicing trays b/c everybody took those trays and slid down Worth Hills. One tray for the rear end and another tray for your feet and away you went not knowing where you would end up b/c you no control over those cafeteria trays direction . A lot of the girls ended up in the creek so wet and cold they could hardly walk to the dorm.

Dedication of Daniel Meyer took place a month or two earlier. Comedian and very popular celebrity Bob Hope was booked as opening entertainment but had to back out at the last minute. Entertainment chairman ............ made a quick phone call to the agent of Henry Mancini. He was begged him to come help dedicate DM. Mr. Mancini flew in and the help of*John Giordano, gathered the Ft. Worth Symphony and for a couple of hours, D&M became the magic of one Henry Mancini Orchestra. What a night that was. Then of all things, guess who walks into the back door of Daniel Meyer? None other than Bob Hope. Hope said and I quote.."Sorry I'm late, I had dinner with the President of the United States and couldn't get out of that." He only spoke for about 15 or 20 minutes, but when he left, people were holding their sides from laughter. If you don't recognize those names Hope and Mancini it is because of era's, Mancini, is the most popular composer of our time! Period. . Wrote the music for Breakfast at Tiffany, Pink Panther and 27 other gigantic hits for the motion picture screen. Believe it or not, you would recognize every song he wrote even though you don't recognize the name.

What can you say about Bob Hope. Just simply the best, most popular comedian of that era. He for instance, had the private phone numbers of every King, President, Queen, Pope in the world. Popular won't even come close to this mans reputation

*The music people of TCU, Ft. Worth and the world know the name Giordano. At this time, John was a teacher and part student but had already set his mark in the music business. A short time later , John became the director of the Ft. Worth Symphony and they traveled the world playing London, Berlin, Mosco and so forth. Dear John is a magnificent fellow and later became heavily evolved with the Van Cliburn World competition for the very best pianist in the world. That too was held at TCU for many years. See there people, TCU may be a small university but commands the respect the world over. Then theirs the absolute QUEEN of Broadway. Yep she two graduated from TCU. Betty retired a few years back and lives Ft. Worth. Millions of people adore her and when she walked on stage...well,, lets just say, she is the best NewYork has ever seen. Then, the guy who wrote for the Star Telegram and became a CBS TV News host and has a TCU building named in his honor. Know who I'm talking about here? You knew in class long before he became famous, he was going to be special. Right along with Linda Kay, photographer, journalist and all around great person. Wish we could see her pictures of TCU. There are thousands of them.
 

FrogAbroad

Full Member
94520_DSC_7088.JPG.preview.jpg

Frog Fountain lit up for a Homecoming celebration, October 14, 2005.

There's a small collection of Linda's TCU-related work (only 1,874 images) free for the looking HERE.
 

Tim Griffin

Active Member
Linda and I were not close friends but I knew her through her younger brother and via her work at Paschal High and, of course, TCU. Always a cheerful, highly competent professional, she added a lot to the graphic histories of both schools. Her kind of talent isn't encountered every day. She was a blessing to TCU.
A good Jewish girl, she loved TCU.
 

PurpleBlood87

Active Member
This picture has two important notes to be added. First the paint on D-M was barely dry when this picture was taken.
Secondly if memory is correct, this picture was taken in or around March 7th. On March 7th, Worth Hills received 2.50 inches of snow and TCU cancelled classes that day b/c of the snow. Also on that date, the cafeteria ran out of servicing trays b/c everybody took those trays and slid down Worth Hills. One tray for the rear end and another tray for your feet and away you went not knowing where you would end up b/c you no control over those cafeteria trays direction . A lot of the girls ended up in the creek so wet and cold they could hardly walk to the dorm.

Dedication of Daniel Meyer took place a month or two earlier. Comedian and very popular celebrity Bob Hope was booked as opening entertainment but had to back out at the last minute. Entertainment chairman ............ made a quick phone call to the agent of Henry Mancini. He was begged him to come help dedicate DM. Mr. Mancini flew in and the help of*John Giordano, gathered the Ft. Worth Symphony and for a couple of hours, D&M became the magic of one Henry Mancini Orchestra. What a night that was. Then of all things, guess who walks into the back door of Daniel Meyer? None other than Bob Hope. Hope said and I quote.."Sorry I'm late, I had dinner with the President of the United States and couldn't get out of that." He only spoke for about 15 or 20 minutes, but when he left, people were holding their sides from laughter. If you don't recognize those names Hope and Mancini it is because of era's, Mancini, is the most popular composer of our time! Period. . Wrote the music for Breakfast at Tiffany, Pink Panther and 27 other gigantic hits for the motion picture screen. Believe it or not, you would recognize every song he wrote even though you don't recognize the name.

What can you say about Bob Hope. Just simply the best, most popular comedian of that era. He for instance, had the private phone numbers of every King, President, Queen, Pope in the world. Popular won't even come close to this mans reputation

*The music people of TCU, Ft. Worth and the world know the name Giordano. At this time, John was a teacher and part student but had already set his mark in the music business. A short time later , John became the director of the Ft. Worth Symphony and they traveled the world playing London, Berlin, Mosco and so forth. Dear John is a magnificent fellow and later became heavily evolved with the Van Cliburn World competition for the very best pianist in the world. That too was held at TCU for many years. See there people, TCU may be a small university but commands the respect the world over. Then theirs the absolute QUEEN of Broadway. Yep she two graduated from TCU. Betty retired a few years back and lives Ft. Worth. Millions of people adore her and when she walked on stage...well,, lets just say, she is the best NewYork has ever seen. Then, the guy who wrote for the Star Telegram and became a CBS TV News host and has a TCU building named in his honor. Know who I'm talking about here? You knew in class long before he became famous, he was going to be special. Right along with Linda Kay, photographer, journalist and all around great person. Wish we could see her pictures of TCU. There are thousands of them.

This might help.

 
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