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The Digital Purge

Baseball Says Cuba ‘Sí,’ Georgia ‘No’
The league talks up its ‘values’ in the U.S. but loves doing business with Castro.


By Mary Anastasia O'Grady

April 11, 2021 4:48 pm ET
im-322239
Cuban President Raúl Castro cheers next to President Obama at a baseball game in Havana, March 22, 2016.

PHOTO: AP
Major League Baseball says “values” compelled it to move this summer’s All-Star Game out of Georgia. But this piety doesn’t square with its long record of collaboration with Cuba’s military dictatorship, one of the world’s most notorious human-rights violators.

This is especially relevant now, as the Cuban struggle for free speech and artistic liberty reaches new heights in the humble San Isidro neighborhood of Havana.

Baseball advertises itself as a champion of racial justice. But the league’s practice of engaging with the Castros as if the regime were normal has had the opposite effect. It has added to the isolation of Cuban dissidents.

San Isidro’s brave musicians, performance artists, writers and intellectuals, who are overwhelmingly people of color, are a prime example. They have to work extra hard against the myth, strengthened by years of major-league complicity, that Fidel and Raúl Castro ended social injustices, including the marginalization of black Cubans.

As recently as 2018, Major League Baseball sought a deal with Raúl under which Havana would send players to the U.S. and baseball would garnish their salaries and send the dollars back to the dictatorship—as if the players were the regime’s property rather than the teams’ employees.

Major League Baseball said it would be paying the Cuban baseball league, which it absurdly described as independent of the totalitarian regime. At the time, a U.S. baseball official assured me that the league’s “intentions are pure.”

That made me laugh out loud because, as I wrote in a column on Dec. 30, 2018, the deal was purely mercenary: “The league gets cheaper talent in exchange for enforcing regime control of the players.”

The Trump administration shot down the proposal, but it stands as evidence of the league’s ethics.

The Castro regime is hypersensitive about its reputation for repression, and it spends enormous resources on propaganda to combat it. Baseball has often proved useful in that effort.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/baseball-says-cuba-si-georgia-no-11618174108?mod=opinion_featst_pos2
 

LVH

Active Member
Project Veritas now permanently banned from Twitter; PV will sue Twitter for defamation.

NY Post story on Marxist BLM leader buying multiple properties banned from Facebook.

Corporate Totalitarianism, in my opinion, is the biggest threat this country is facing. Obviously fiat currency and hyper interventionist foreign policy are major threats too, but corporations these days have become more powerful than the government, and our government is outsourcing their totalitarian wishes and directives to these "private" corporations so they can do the dirty work for the government. This way it can survive legal muster.

It's only going to get worse until someone stands up to it. I am in line with the pundits out there who believe eventually we are going to have two different countries - one consisting of states that allow this to continue, and the other consisting of countries that refuse to allow it to happen. And its not just about censorship, but also about social justice and virtue signaling from corporations and corporations entering the political arena, and COVID/vaccine mandates.

I said this last summer and was mocked as a conspiracy theorist. There will be compliance states, and then there will be resistance states. It's why I ultimately believe nothing would have been different if the 2 Republicans won the senate races in Georgia. Neither one of them would stand up to corporate totalitarianism, fiat currency or hyper interventionist foreign policy.
 

Mean Purple

Active Member
https://www.cnet.com/news/pink-floyd-to-mark-zuckerberg-youre-an-idiot-leave-our-song-alone/


Pink Floyd to Mark Zuckerberg: You're an idiot, leave our song alone
Roger Waters blows up after Facebook tries to buy Another Brick in the Wall Part 2 for an Instagram ad.

tumblr_ow6fu7LjT51tuaz2oo1_500.gif
"How did this little prick who started off by saying, 'She's pretty, we'll give her a 4 out of 5, she's ugly, we'll give her a 1,' how the ... did he get any power?" the musician said. "And yet here he is, one of the most powerful idiots in the world."
 

Mean Purple

Active Member
Baseball Says Cuba ‘Sí,’ Georgia ‘No’
The league talks up its ‘values’ in the U.S. but loves doing business with Castro.


By Mary Anastasia O'Grady

April 11, 2021 4:48 pm ET
im-322239
Cuban President Raúl Castro cheers next to President Obama at a baseball game in Havana, March 22, 2016.

PHOTO: AP
Major League Baseball says “values” compelled it to move this summer’s All-Star Game out of Georgia. But this piety doesn’t square with its long record of collaboration with Cuba’s military dictatorship, one of the world’s most notorious human-rights violators.

This is especially relevant now, as the Cuban struggle for free speech and artistic liberty reaches new heights in the humble San Isidro neighborhood of Havana.

Baseball advertises itself as a champion of racial justice. But the league’s practice of engaging with the Castros as if the regime were normal has had the opposite effect. It has added to the isolation of Cuban dissidents.

San Isidro’s brave musicians, performance artists, writers and intellectuals, who are overwhelmingly people of color, are a prime example. They have to work extra hard against the myth, strengthened by years of major-league complicity, that Fidel and Raúl Castro ended social injustices, including the marginalization of black Cubans.

As recently as 2018, Major League Baseball sought a deal with Raúl under which Havana would send players to the U.S. and baseball would garnish their salaries and send the dollars back to the dictatorship—as if the players were the regime’s property rather than the teams’ employees.

Major League Baseball said it would be paying the Cuban baseball league, which it absurdly described as independent of the totalitarian regime. At the time, a U.S. baseball official assured me that the league’s “intentions are pure.”

That made me laugh out loud because, as I wrote in a column on Dec. 30, 2018, the deal was purely mercenary: “The league gets cheaper talent in exchange for enforcing regime control of the players.”

The Trump administration shot down the proposal, but it stands as evidence of the league’s ethics.

The Castro regime is hypersensitive about its reputation for repression, and it spends enormous resources on propaganda to combat it. Baseball has often proved useful in that effort.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/baseball-says-cuba-si-georgia-no-11618174108?mod=opinion_featst_pos2
ok, so as do many, I think it is bad policy to do biz with the commie regime in Cuba. I actually think that regime should have been taken down years ago, in part due to our own national security, and in big part related to the need to free those people from that awful dictatorship and its cruelty.

When Obama and his pals went down there and were dancing and partying with the lords of evil, it was obvious what they were about.
 
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