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Gary Patterson and Leon Bridges interview

Hoosierfrog

Tier 1
Whether you love or dislike Gary this interview is worth reading. He is an interesting person who I think has learned a few things along the way. He is not nearly perfect (which I bet that Gary would agree) but Patterson like it or not will always be associated with TCU and Fort Worth.
I’m guessing it’ll be a long time before anyone accomplishes as much as he did…
 

Froggy Style

Active Member
Gary can be likable when he’s not Mr. stubborn. I’m glad he gets to do full time what he was already doing part time: Music, charity and helping UT.
 

Palliative Care

Active Member
That is part of the reason they hired him. If you can’t beat him, have him join you. Actually I wish him good luck against OU. I want to see them take a few on the chin this year.
 

Froggy Style

Active Member
Or in my list of things he was already doing. He dominated Texas.
It was a bit of a joke, but he was helping UT (the team that had been beating them regularly) by letting TCU go to crap while he played music star, made no changes to his slumping program, and hired jokers old buddies in the hope of nobody qualified being around to replace him.
 

Showtime Joe 2.0

Ticket Exchange Pass
I was surprised to read in that article that Patterson had interviewed for the head coaching job at Michigan after they fired Rich Rodriguez. That was right after we won the Rose Bowl so I know Patterson was a hot commodity then but I've never heard that before. And the way Patterson described his job interview was rather strange, claiming that he spent 45 minutes telling the Michigan AD that he wasn't the right man for the job!

I know that coaching football at the highest levels is a strange profession but sometimes I think that Patterson is really kind of a strange person himself in many ways.
 

Palliative Care

Active Member
I quite agree that Gary is unique/strange individual. But then again that is what made him different enough to build the career he did. He was almost a total opposite of Coach Fran and we all know how he turned out. He was the type who would eventual stay his whole career in one spot because he shunned the limelight and embraced us and Fort Worth.
 

TCUdirtbag

Active Member
I was surprised to read in that article that Patterson had interviewed for the head coaching job at Michigan after they fired Rich Rodriguez. That was right after we won the Rose Bowl so I know Patterson was a hot commodity then but I've never heard that before. And the way Patterson described his job interview was rather strange, claiming that he spent 45 minutes telling the Michigan AD that he wasn't the right man for the job!

I know that coaching football at the highest levels is a strange profession but sometimes I think that Patterson is really kind of a strange person himself in many ways.

Most of the great coaches are total weirdos.
 

Frozen Frog

Active Member
After reading this article I get the feeling that Patterson's time Austin might not be that long. It seemed like he was starting to get ready to retire, and I think he will remain around Ft. Worth which is good for TCU, FTW, and I think the Pattersons. This interview left me with a little better feeling about Patterson. I know his tenure didn't end like anyone wanted, but I do want what is best for him. There is almost never a good way to end a coaching career. He gave a lot to TCU.
 

Palliative Care

Active Member
Great coaches often end poorly. oddly what helps to make a coach great becomes what does them in.

I remember Tom Landry just could not move on from his antiquated flex defense. Patterson the same with his 4-2-5. He did try to modify it but in the end he lost his players in part because of his growing frustrations with his defense. I know there were many other thing people will castigate him for but in the end his failures all come down to failure to adapt his program to changes around him. He was a coach from a different era, like Woody Hayes and Joe Paterno became at their ends.
 

tcumaniac

Full Member
"...the people in Austin have been great to me, and I’m one of those kinds of guys where, if I want to do something, I don’t kind of do it. I go all in; I’m not a good yes-man. And so, I’m trying to do, within my role, whatever [Sarkisian] wants me to do to make University of Texas better."

Funny to see him admit that. He sure was good at hiring yes-men though. Insulating himself with yes-men and not allowing fresh ideas into his program was unfortunately the leading cause of his downfall.
 
I think referring to Patterson as strange/weird is unfounded and presumptuous. Rather, I think that from what we know of him, most of us would embrace having GP as a close friend. You can get in line behind me. Well, I despise lines, so have at it.
 
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