• The KillerFrogs

Carp homers for Yankees

froginmn

Full Member
Yankees always do this. I remember when they resurrected Chuck Knoblauch
Ummm.... Are you thinking of someone else?




Once considered one of the game's best fielders (in fact, ESPN personalities nicknamed him "Fundamentally Sound" Chuck Knoblauch), Knoblauch's play deteriorated shortly into his Yankee career; his errors at second doubled from 13 in 1998 to 26 the following year; all of these were throwing errors. In 2000, he began to have difficulty making accurate throws to first base, a condition sometimes referred to in baseball as the "yips" or "Steve Sax syndrome" in more recent years.

Knoblauch tried various solutions to his problem, but his throwing did not improve. He made 15 errors in less than half a season in 2000, including 10 throwing miscues. (During one game, an errant throw sailed into the stands and hit sportscaster Keith Olbermann's mother in the head).[10] After making three throwing errors in six innings of the Yankees' 12–3 loss to the Chicago White Sox, on June 15, 2000, Knoblauch voluntarily left the game. He then left Yankee Stadium in his street clothes while the game was still in progress.[11] He was back at second the next day, but Knoblauch never fully recovered his throwing accuracy, especially after missing most of August with an injury. Knoblauch returned to the Yankees in September, but was often used as a designated hitter in lieu of playing second; he was exclusively a DH in the Yankees' run to a World Series title. Finally, in 2001, he was reassigned to left field by manager Joe Torre, never to return to his old position.


As linked above, he hit over .300 three out of seven years with the Twins (over .330 twice), and never with the Yanks.
 
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Brevity Frog

Active Member
Yeah it looks like you’re right. I suppose it was just the notoriety from the four World Series played in that I am remembering. It was very unfortunate when he developed the yips later in his career.
 

PurplFrawg

Administrator
Ummm.... Are you thinking of someone else?




Once considered one of the game's best fielders (in fact, ESPN personalities nicknamed him "Fundamentally Sound" Chuck Knoblauch), Knoblauch's play deteriorated shortly into his Yankee career; his errors at second doubled from 13 in 1998 to 26 the following year; all of these were throwing errors. In 2000, he began to have difficulty making accurate throws to first base, a condition sometimes referred to in baseball as the "yips" or "Steve Sax syndrome" in more recent years.

Knoblauch tried various solutions to his problem, but his throwing did not improve. He made 15 errors in less than half a season in 2000, including 10 throwing miscues. (During one game, an errant throw sailed into the stands and hit sportscaster Keith Olbermann's mother in the head).[10] After making three throwing errors in six innings of the Yankees' 12–3 loss to the Chicago White Sox, on June 15, 2000, Knoblauch voluntarily left the game. He then left Yankee Stadium in his street clothes while the game was still in progress.[11] He was back at second the next day, but Knoblauch never fully recovered his throwing accuracy, especially after missing most of August with an injury. Knoblauch returned to the Yankees in September, but was often used as a designated hitter in lieu of playing second; he was exclusively a DH in the Yankees' run to a World Series title. Finally, in 2001, he was reassigned to left field by manager Joe Torre, never to return to his old position.


As linked above, he hit over .300 three out of seven years with the Twins (over .330 twice), and never with the Yanks.
All that and you didn't mention the obvious reason...he was an Aggie.
 

froginmn

Full Member
You mean the 9 1/2 hat size didn't just slip past everybody?
I read comments from him saying that the PEDS didn't help; his batting average was lower after taking them.

Uh, yeah but you hit a lot more home runs after; I'd expect HGH to help you hit the ball farther, not more accurately...
 

BrewingFrog

Was I supposed to type something here?
I read comments from him saying that the PEDS didn't help; his batting average was lower after taking them.

Uh, yeah but you hit a lot more home runs after; I'd expect HGH to help you hit the ball farther, not more accurately...
Candidly, pitchers noted that it helped them recover quicker. Didn't build strength or anything but they came back fresher and had more longevity. It helped other players come back from injury quicker. So there was some speeding up of the healing process at the very least.

It is my understanding that a certain player consumed a number of naughty substances, and inflated quite a bit. It is also noted that the source of all his batting prowess was not the bursting musculature (although it certainly helped!), but the elbow brace that kept his swing in a particular plane. I note that MLB doesn't allow such mechanical contraptions anymore...
 
I read comments from him saying that the PEDS didn't help; his batting average was lower after taking them.

Uh, yeah but you hit a lot more home runs after; I'd expect HGH to help you hit the ball farther, not more accurately...
After the Yanks moved Chuck Knoblach to left (because of his incurable yips at 2nd), Twins’ fans threw hot dogs at him on dollar hot dog night in the Metrodome. The game had a long stoppage at one point. They never did get the mustard stains out of the carpet.

Knoblach likely saved the 1991 World Series in the eighth inning of game 7, tied at 0-0, with the fake throw to SS Gagne. Jack Morris then finishes a complete 10 inning game for the 1-0 win of a Classic World Series.


 
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bmoney214

Full Member
After the Yanks moved Chuck Knoblach to left (because of his incurable yips at 2nd), Twins’ fans threw hot dogs at him on dollar hot dog night in the Metrodome. The game had a long stoppage at one point. They never did get the mustard stains out of the carpet.

Knoblach likely saved the 1991 World Series in the eighth inning of game 7, tied at 0-0, with the fake throw to SS Gagne. Jack Morris then finishes a complete 10 inning game for the 1-0 win of a Classic World Series.



I'll never forget that World Series. Kirby Puckett's catch and walkoff homerun in game 6 broke my lil 13 year old heart.
 

bmoney214

Full Member
That was Jack Buck's last World Series.

In both of the Twins' WS the home team won all seven games.

That 91 series was maybe the best ever.
I lost a bet to my uncle in that Series. Since I was going for the Braves, he went for the Twins(he only did it to mess with me). The loser had to wear the winners hat everyday until baseball season started the next year. I hated that damn hat lol.
 
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