• The KillerFrogs

Best Steak you ever ate: Home grilled or Restaurant?

dawg

Active Member
I've gotten my steak game to the point that I won't pay for one at a restaurant anymore. Granted, I've never eaten at Pappa's Bros or Del Frisco's or any of the really high-end places (not KF.C 1%). Costco usually sells good quality prime steaks at a very good price.
 

Dogfrog

Active Member
Home. When I can control the variables, I get an excellent final product!

We are lucky in that I know some local butchers, who have excellent meats sourced from good slaughterhouses, and who know how to cut steaks right. That's the first step.

Second step is prepping the steaks with kosher salt and letting them come up to temperature for a few hours. I used to use pepper, and garlic, on the meat as a rub pre-cooking. But the garlic will scorch and become bitter, and the pepper will do the same thing. I have discovered the beauty of chili powder as a seasoning, as the chilie oil will penetrate the meat with the salt during the time it sits out. Yum!

Thirdly, there's the fire. Either white-hot coals or a screaming hot iron skillet. Sear and sear, then indirect heat until done. Still haven't broken out the sous-vide, but that may happen during this imposed hermitage...

I will say, though, that a steak sourced from Ailen Bros., cooked on Ronnie Killen's wood-burning custom stove at the BBQ joint, is a damned fine thing.

If Killens steakhouse is still in Pearland, that used to be a winner too.
 

BrewingFrog

Was I supposed to type something here?
O.K. Lord Fletcher's...



Bourdain did a segment on Lord Fletcher's, but YouTube won't call it up.

Insanely good.
 

steelfrog

Ticket Exchange Pass
Dad had gotten on a hunting lease with some Army buddies in '86 down in Zapata County. Thick mesquite country, with senderos to hunt, and horrifying rattlesnakes to avoid.*

*Two of the guys in our group shot a 14-foot rattlesnake.

14 feet!!! Eek!

the longest western diamondback ever recorded is just under 8 feet (92.5”) so no, not 14 feet.
 

stbrab

Full Member
Dad had gotten on a hunting lease with some Army buddies in '86 down in Zapata County. Thick mesquite country, with senderos to hunt, and horrifying rattlesnakes to avoid.*

We shot a young buck the first night, and the camp guys cleaned and cooked the beast for dinner. The grill consisted of old bedsprings moved over a perfect bed of mesquite coals, lovingly tended with an old rake.

The five of us sat on rickety chairs, feet up on rocks by the fire, looking up at the star-washed sky. The venison was perfection.



*Two of the guys in our group shot a 14-foot rattlesnake.

14 feet!!! Eek!
14 feet? I've never heard of one that long...did y'all skin him and cook him?

By the way, the largest I've ever seen was approximately 7 1/2 feet. He covered the entire width of the wheel ruts in a dirt road.
 
Curiously, I seem to have developed an insatiable desire for a nice thick, juicy Rib Eye, accompanied by a

Grey Goose Vodka martini with olives.
 

BrewingFrog

Was I supposed to type something here?
14 feet? I've never heard of one that long...did y'all skin him and cook him?

By the way, the largest I've ever seen was approximately 7 1/2 feet. He covered the entire width of the wheel ruts in a dirt road.
When we arrived, the two guys who got the rattlesnake (Army Rangers, who were playing with custom compound bows. "Want to try it?" one asked. I couldn't even pull the string past the cams. "What's the pull on this?" "110 pounds!" Egad!) pointed out a tree where they had hung it up. I walked over to the tree, but I saw no snake. I looked some more, and began to feel as if a leg was being tugged on. I looked around at them, and they gestured to look again. I turned and looked, and suddenly, what I took on first glance to be a tree trunk was actually a snake! It was draped over a branch which was taller than I was, and the body (sans head and rattler) reached the ground on both sides with some to spare. There was plenty of meat there, I suppose, but I have avoided rattler up to now...

Not long after, Dad and I were unpacking in the little hunting cabin. I gestured towards the little knee-high snake chaps we had brought with us, and said "I really don't think those are going to do us a helluva lot of good." I figured a snake like I had seen would hit me about mid-chest. I'd need plate armour for something like that...

I also know that the 30 foot walk to my stand from the truck that evening was much longer than it seemed.
 

toadallytexan

ToadallyTexan
It’s called a jaccard. I own a couple and use them occasionally in bbq, more often with steaks or roasts. They work very well.

edit: had one in the garage. Look like this?
Exactamundo! Jaccard, eh? Only thing is, the one I bought is the much more macho-looking black. I wonder if it can double as an ice pick?
vUcqWSy.jpg
 

Frog-in-law1995

Active Member
I just ordered the Two Pig Seasoning based on your recommendation

It’s amazing on steak. Wins steak competitions all the time. Just tasting it by itself, I’d swear it is too spicy for the average person, but it wins. Word of warning, one of the hotter spice in it (I’m assuming it’s the cayenne) is practically in dust form and always puffs a little into the air when you open it. I pretty much sneeze every time. It tastes spicier by itself when testing it than it does when eating it on a steak, but if you have some very spice-averse mouths to feed, you might also try Chupacabra steak seasoning.

edit: pretty much all I put on steaks these days. Maybe butter.

P7rIeKX.jpg
 
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steelfrog

Ticket Exchange Pass
While yuo were living in Northern VA (otherwise known as the "cradle of slavery") you cooke da steak for Steel and once it was generously slatthered with ketchup it didn't make the ketchup taste that bad. Steel trite eating a pirece without he ketchup and it was dry, overcooked, over seasoned. In short, it tasted like -- you guessed it -- an unmitigated pile of dogcrap.

That is all
 
While yuo were living in Northern VA (otherwise known as the "cradle of slavery") you cooke da steak for Steel and once it was generously slatthered with ketchup it didn't make the ketchup taste that bad. Steel trite eating a pirece without he ketchup and it was dry, overcooked, over seasoned. In short, it tasted like -- you guessed it -- an unmitigated pile of dogcrap.

That is all
Blasphemer! Lies. Evil lies.
 

Dogfrog

Active Member
Best steak I've ever had the pleasure to eat was at Saddle & Sirloin in the heart of the Fort Worth Stockyards.

It's long gone, but I can still taste that filet...

Go Frogs!

Also, you probably know this but I discovered a while back that the Riscky family bought the Saddle & Sirloin site but expanded it. I have not eaten there but understand they attempt to cook steaks in a similar fashion and also serve the Kraut soup.
 

Frog DJ

Active Member
Also, you probably know this but I discovered a while back that the Riscky family bought the Saddle & Sirloin site but expanded it. I have not eaten there but understand they attempt to cook steaks in a similar fashion and also serve the Kraut soup.
My parents ate at S&S every Friday night - I do mean EVERY Friday night. My Pop was the VP of the old North Fort Worth State Bank, and my mother would drive up from Wedgwood and meet him there for their "date night."

The Kraut soup was one her favorites too, but the filet mignon was to DIE for! I don't know what Theo used to make them taste the way they did, but I've NEVER had anything that even comes close to how he charbroiled them!

Because it was their "date night" I rarely got to go to S&S, and slept over at my grandparents' house EVERY Friday night, while mom and pop "cut loose" at S&S (and who knows where else). I adored my grandma and grandpa.

Grandpa died in 1960, and being 12-years old I didn't need a babysitter anymore, but I still loved sleeping over at grandma's house on Friday nights, when she would pan-fry chicken for me in a cast iron skillet EVERY Friday night.

My memory of S&S was all the faux store fronts on the walls, and old man Theo standing in front of that huge open fire grill, as he cooked steak after steak after steak. I always looked forward to going there.

When I was stationed at Fort Hood in 1970, I worked 18 hours a weekend on WBAP and stayed at Mom and Pop's house Friday and Saturday nights. Of course, we would always begin the weekend by meeting at S&S.

My folks bragged to their friends that they never knew how many lonely, hungry soldiers I would invite to tag along, but they were always delighted to feed them all, and let them stay with us over the weekend.

As a PFC I made just over $100 a month in the Army, but WBAP was paying me $10 an hour to work on the air over a weekend, so I was making $180 a week, and as such - I was the richest PFC in Killeen, Texas.

Go Frogs!
 

Dogfrog

Active Member
My parents ate at S&S every Friday night - I do mean EVERY Friday night. My Pop was the VP of the old North Fort Worth State Bank, and my mother would drive up from Wedgwood and meet him there for their "date night."

The Kraut soup was one her favorites too, but the filet mignon was to DIE for! I don't know what Theo used to make them taste the way they did, but I've NEVER had anything that even comes close to how he charbroiled them!

Because it was their "date night" I rarely got to go to S&S, and slept over at my grandparents' house EVERY Friday night, while mom and pop "cut loose" at S&S (and who knows where else). I adored my grandma and grandpa.

Grandpa died in 1960, and being 12-years old I didn't need a babysitter anymore, but I still loved sleeping over at grandma's house on Friday nights, when she would pan-fry chicken for me in a cast iron skillet EVERY Friday night.

My memory of S&S was all the faux store fronts on the walls, and old man Theo standing in front of that huge open fire grill, as he cooked steak after steak after steak. I always looked forward to going there.

When I was stationed at Fort Hood in 1970, I worked 18 hours a weekend on WBAP and stayed at Mom and Pop's house Friday and Saturday nights. Of course, we would always begin the weekend by meeting at S&S.

My folks bragged to their friends that they never knew how many lonely, hungry soldiers I would invite to tag along, but they were always delighted to feed them all, and let them stay with us over the weekend.

As a PFC I made just over $100 a month in the Army, but WBAP was paying me $10 an hour to work on the air over a weekend, so I was making $180 a week, and as such - I was the richest PFC in Killeen, Texas.

Go Frogs!

Think I read somewhere S&S hired Disney set designers to design the western set inside.
 
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