• All Hail The Hypnotoad

Best albums of all time excluding live or greatest hits compilations

tcudoc

ALL HAIL THE HYPNOTOAD
this is a great point and yet another reason why the death of "album" rock stations is such a loss for music lovers
I am a huge classic rock fan and have a love for knowing classic rock songs that are awesome and unknown by the vast majority. I have often thought that I would love to have a pirate radio station where I would just play songs that I know people would love but may have never heard before. Maybe a 50:50 mix of songs you know vs songs you should have known. This would be where you might here Little Guitars or Dirty Movies by Van Halen followed by The Camera Eye by Rush. Then some well known classic rock followed by a deep track off of the Hagar Schon Aaronson Shrieve album then Over Under Sideways Down by the Yardbirds.
The number of people who would listen is dwindling by the year, but I think there are people who would really enjoy it. I would also take call in requests. Just a pipe dream, but I would love to see a great rock radio station like that exist.
 

Eight

ALL HAIL THE HYPNOTOAD
I am a huge classic rock fan and have a love for knowing classic rock songs that are awesome and unknown by the vast majority. I have often thought that I would love to have a pirate radio station where I would just play songs that I know people would love but may have never heard before. Maybe a 50:50 mix of songs you know vs songs you should have known. This would be where you might here Little Guitars or Dirty Movies by Van Halen followed by The Camera Eye by Rush. Then some well known classic rock followed by a deep track off of the Hagar Schon Aaronson Shrieve album then Over Under Sideways Down by the Yardbirds.
The number of people who would listen is dwindling by the year, but I think there are people who would really enjoy it. I would also take call in requests. Just a pipe dream, but I would love to see a great rock radio station like that exist.

think the true beauty in the situation you are talking about is often times that less known favorite is something that touches a note endearing to me and maybe not you

might be an emotion, a sound, a lyric that resonates with me that you might not understand

unfortunately, in this age of programmed music and artists releasing individual songs these are a dying breed, let alone an album whose songs tell a connected story through each of them
 

tcudoc

ALL HAIL THE HYPNOTOAD
think the true beauty in the situation you are talking about is often times that less known favorite is something that touches a note endearing to me and maybe not you

might be an emotion, a sound, a lyric that resonates with me that you might not understand

unfortunately, in this age of programmed music and artists releasing individual songs these are a dying breed, let alone an album whose songs tell a connected story through each of them
I agree. As an example, Tom Cochrane has a great song called Big League. When I first heard the song, I also heard him interviewed where he told what the song was about. From that point forward, I loved that song and it held a deeper meaning. Similarly, Sting has an unknown song called Lazarus Heart. A truly great song with some really deep hidden meanings. It is about his mother fighting a battle with cancer that she eventually lost. It really resonated with me as I had just lost my mother to cancer around the same time that album came out. That is part of what I miss about buying albums. I used to read all of the liner notes on all of the albums. I knew who the guest musicians were. I knew the lyrics from the lyric sheets included on the notes. I could surmise what the meanings of the song were, or if I didn't know, I could interpret the lyrics to fit what they meant to me. I knew who all of the band members were and what other bands they had previously played in. That stuff meant a lot to me and it now seems very lost with new music in most cases. I think bands like the Foo Fighters and a handful of others make attempts to honor their musical roots, but so much has changed. Not for the better, in my opinion.
 

ftwfrog

ALL HAIL THE HYPNOTOAD
I agree. As an example, Tom Cochrane has a great song called Big League. When I first heard the song, I also heard him interviewed where he told what the song was about. From that point forward, I loved that song and it held a deeper meaning. Similarly, Sting has an unknown song called Lazarus Heart. A truly great song with some really deep hidden meanings. It is about his mother fighting a battle with cancer that she eventually lost. It really resonated with me as I had just lost my mother to cancer around the same time that album came out. That is part of what I miss about buying albums. I used to read all of the liner notes on all of the albums. I knew who the guest musicians were. I knew the lyrics from the lyric sheets included on the notes. I could surmise what the meanings of the song were, or if I didn't know, I could interpret the lyrics to fit what they meant to me. I knew who all of the band members were and what other bands they had previously played in. That stuff meant a lot to me and it now seems very lost with new music in most cases. I think bands like the Foo Fighters and a handful of others make attempts to honor their musical roots, but so much has changed. Not for the better, in my opinion.
I tried explaining this to my kids, and I’m sure I sounded 75 years old. Good artists write their own. A band’s lyrics should have meaning, not just [ Finebaum ] thrown together to fill the beat, sorry new country fans.

Speaking of Foo Fighters, funny story Dave Grohl told on Howard Stern last year. They were recording in studio and Dave was going back and forth on lyrics that he said just didn’t quite have the sentimental hit he wanted it to, but it sounded great. After about 20 mins of messing with it guitarist Chris Shiflet says, “Dave, not every scheissing song can be Imagine”. And they quickly lost their mind, jammed and it sounded great.
 
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